Wednesday, April 20, 2016

South Korean correctional staff tour 3 California prisons


 
In the spirit of cooperation and learning, the South Korean government recently sent several prison employees to tour California correctional facilities.

After visiting San Quentin State Prison and the California Correctional Institution, the seven-member group from the Republic of Korea’s Ministry of Justice took a tour of the California State Prison, Sacramento (CSP-SAC).

Accompanied by an interpreter, the South Korean prison officials were greeted by Lt. Tony Quinn, Community Resources Manager Therese Giannelli and Jae Yang, Supervising Registered Nurse II.

Yang happens to be from Korea and still speaks the language, and so he acted as tour guide during some portions, making the flow of information much easier.

The delegation from South Korea included Daejeon Correctional Institution Vice Warden Jae-Ik Kim, Security Division official Jong-Sun Lee and other custody staff. Daejeon is the country’s largest prison, housing just over 3,000 inmates.
 
Interpreter Samuel Min said the delegation’s members each had 20 to 30 years of correctional experience. The delegates are selected annually from a pool of such officers and officials. The visit to CSP-SAC marked their fourth year.

Chief Deputy Warden David Baughman explained the mission of the Level IV institution.

“We have a complex mission at CSP-SAC. Along with being a level IV institution, we also house inmates with severe mental illnesses. SAC staff is trained to be versatile and cognizant of an offender’s possible disability,” he said.

Baughman discussed the medical system, mental health and how CSP-SAC makes nearly 7,000 meals for the nearby Folsom State Prison and Folsom Women’s Facility.

Intrigued by the medical and mental health services, the delegation requested to visit those specific areas.

First, Lt. Quinn showed the group the minimum support facility, housing nearly 170 low-level inmates in two dormitories.

“The remainder of our 2,300 inmates are all level IV. Yes, it’s maximum security,” he explained to the delegation through their interpreter. “As we go through the rest of the institution, you are going to see less (inmate) movement and more staff presence.”

The delegates were shown the Psychiatric Services Unit, radiology, dental, triage, a housing unit and the A Facility yard.


The group also saw an Arts-in-Corrections volunteer teaching classical guitar to inmates in the housing unit.

“We have about 108 different classes per month like this through Arts in Corrections,” CRM Giannelli said. “Then we have other programs like Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous and religious programs, just to name a few. Over 1,000 hours per month are done by volunteers.”

Lt. Quinn also discussed some of the vocational training programs available to the low-level inmates.

“Providing a job skill is part of rehabilitative programs,” he explained. “Participation varies but we have about 100 inmates participating. We require they complete an education program, so they have to earn a GED or high school diploma.”

The health care improvements at CSP-SAC seemed to impress the delegation.

“They were very happy to learn about your health care system,” said interpreter Min. “They said this is the most advanced system they’ve ever seen. (The vice warden) is very impressed by your people working in this facility.”

During visits to the other two institutions, the delegation was shown different aspects of the state prison system.

“The conversation back and forth was good,” said Sgt. Christopher Siino, administrative assistant to San Quentin Warden Ron Davis. “During the tour I had an officer come over and explain the different types of protective equipment (and) the training the Department gives.”

They were also taken to the firing range for a demonstration.

At California Correctional Institution, the delegation was shown protective gear and given a tour of the facility led by Lt. Joshua Tyree.

"I took them to our Level I Sensitive Needs Yard Facility and we went into Van Wesson Hall.  I had an Officer display the personal equipment that he was wearing on the yard and explained what each item was utilized for," Lt. Tyree said. "From there I took them to the Level 1 visiting where I displayed the two types of personal vests assigned to custody. They were very impressed with the difference in weight from the stab-resistant vest to the bullet-resistant vest."

The delegation also learned about CDCR's Crisis Response Teams (CRT).

"CRT Commander Lieutenant L. Machado briefed them on what CRT was and how they are used," Lt. Tyree said. "We provided them with hearing and eye protection and took them to the range (for a demonstration)."
 

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

CDCR Observes National Crime Victims’ Rights Week


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
APRIL 12, 2016
                     CONTACT: JOE ORLANDO
                                      (916) 445-4950



CDCR Observes National Crime Victims’ Rights Week
Honoring victims, survivors and those who protect their rights and serve their needs

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) observed National Crime Victims’ Rights Week today with a community event in Fremont Park, which included a ceremony and moment of silence to remember and honor victims, survivors and families affected by crime.

“I am very proud of CDCR's continued commitment to victims,” said CDCR Secretary Scott Kernan. “Victims and their advocates offer an important perspective and we help make sure their voices are clearly heard in the criminal justice system, specifically within CDCR. Our renewed focus on rehabilitating offenders will help reduce victimization.”

Today’s event was organized by CDCR’s Office of Victim and Survivor Rights and Services (OVSRS), which provides comprehensive services to crime victims and families. Other organizations in attendance included the California Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board, Mothers Against Drunk Driving, Parents of Murdered Children, Volunteers in Victim Assistance, Crime Victims Coalition, Citizens Against Homicide and Women Escaping a Violent Environment.

In California, victims of crime have rights, including notification of an offender’s status, participation in the juvenile and criminal justice processes, and reimbursement by the offender for costs related to their offense against a victim, to name a few. Formed in 1988, OVSRS offers services to crime victims and families, including outreach and restitution. OVSRS may also refer victims to agencies that provide counseling and support services.

Of note, in 2015 a total of $22,124,109 was collected in victim restitution and fines from adult and juvenile offenders. Collected funds are transferred to the Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board for eventual disbursement to victims, as well as support of victim services programs statewide. Also last year, OVSRS staff assisted 2,062 victims and next-of-kin to attend their offender’s parole hearing process, either in person or via audio/video conferencing. In addition, OVSRS spent more than $80,000 to help more than 470 victims and families attend parole suitability hearings.

This year’s National Crime Victims’ Rights Week is observed from April 10 through April 16. For more information on other statewide events throughout the week, visit

www.cdcr.ca.gov/victim_services/docs/VictimsWk-calendar-2016.pdf. For more information on OVSRS, visit www.cdcr.ca.gov/Victim_Services/index.html.

For information about the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, please contact Albert Rivas, Deputy Chief, Office of External Affairs at (916) 324-6508 or by email at Albert.Rivas@cdcr.ca.gov

Monday, April 4, 2016

Governor Brown Announces CDCR Leadership Appointments


Office of the Governor
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Contact: Governor's Press Office
Monday, April 4, 2016
(916) 445-4571

Governor Brown Announces Appointments

SACRAMENTO – Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today announced the following appointments:
 
Ralph M. Diaz, 46, of Sacramento, has been appointed undersecretary for operations at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, where he has served as deputy director of facility operations since 2014 and was associate director of high security institutions from 2013 to 2014. He served in serval position at the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran from 2000 to 2013, including warden, acting warden, chief deputy administrator, captain and counselor supervisor. Diaz was a correctional counselor and correctional officer at the California State Prison, Corcoran, from 1993 to 2000 and a correctional officer at Wasco State Prison from 1991 to 1993. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $167,364. Diaz is registered without party preference.
 
Kathleen Allison, 51, of Sacramento, has been appointed director of the Division of Adult Institutions at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, where she has been deputy director of facility support since 2012 and was associate director of female offender programs and services from 2011 to 2012. Allison served in several positions at the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran from 2002 to 2011, including warden, chief deputy warden, associate warden and correctional health services administrator. She held several positions at Avenal State Prison from 1987 to 2002, including community resources manager, senior medical technical assistant and medical technical assistant. Allison was a senior medical technical assistant at North Kern State Prison from 1993 to 1994. She is a licensed registered nurse. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $163,212. Allison is a Republican.
 
Jeffrey Macomber, 46, of Sacramento, has been appointed deputy director of facility support in the Division of Adult Institutions at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. He has been warden at California State Prison, Sacramento since 2014, where he served as chief deputy warden from 2009 to 2014 and associate warden from 2008 to 2009. Macomber served as associate warden at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Adult Institutions from 2004 to 2008, where he was staff services manager from 1997 to 2000 and associate governmental programs analyst from 1994 to 1997. Macomber was a correctional business manager at the Richard A. McGee Correctional Training Center from 2000 to 2004 and a correctional officer at Ironwood State Prison from 1993 to 1994. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $151,116. Macomber is a Republican.
 
Guillermo Viera Rosa, 41, of Riverside, has been appointed director of the Division of Adult Parole Operations at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, where he has been regional parole administrator since 2015 and has served in several positions since 2000, including associate director, parole administrator, parole agent supervisor and parole agent. Viera Rosa served in several positions at the Board of Parole Hearings from 2004 to 2009, including deputy commissioner, correctional counselor supervisor and parole agent specialist. He was an instructor at the Riverside County Office of Education from 2003 to 2004 and a deputy probation officer at the San Bernardino County Probation Department from 1995 to 2000. Viera Rosa earned a Doctor of Law and Policy degree from Northeastern University and a Master of Arts degree in social science from Azusa Pacific University. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $151,116. Viera Rosa is registered without party preference.
 
Connie Gipson, 52, of Bakersfield, has been appointed deputy director of facility operations in the Division of Adult Institutions at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitations, where she has served as associate director of general population male offenders since 2013. Gipson served in several positions at California State Prison, Corcoran from 2010 to 2013, including warden, acting warden and chief deputy warden. She was associate warden at North Kern State Prison from 2008 to 2010 and held several positions at Wasco State Prison from 1997 to 2008, including captain, business manager and health program coordinator. Gipson was a senior medical technical assistant at the California Institution for Women from 1994 to 1997, where she was a medical technical assistant from 1988 to 1994. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $149,556. Gipson is a Democrat.
 
Lucy Dunn, 63, of Coto de Caza, has been reappointed to the California Transportation Commission, where she has served since 2008. Dunn has been president and chief executive officer at the Orange County Business Council since 2005. She was director at the California Department of Housing and Community Development from 2004 to 2005 and senior vice president at Hearthside Homes Inc. from 1990 to 2004 and at Signal Landmark from 1987 to 1990. Dunn was principal at the Law Offices of Lucetta Dunn from 1981 to 1987. She is a member of the Ontario International Airport Authority and the Lennar Charitable Housing Foundation Board of Directors. Dunn earned a Juris Doctor degree from the Western State College of Law. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Dunn is a Republican.
 
John Dunbar, 52, of Yountville, has been reappointed to the 25th District Agricultural Association, Napa Town and Country Fair Board of Directors, where he has served since 2012. Dunbar has been mayor of Yountville since 2010. He was senior graphic designer at the University of California, Berkeley from 1990 to 2014 and sports editor and reporter at the Tahoe Daily Tribune from 1987 to 1989. Dunbar is president of the Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater Board of Directors and a member of the Native Sons of the Golden West and Friends of the Community United in Service. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Dunbar is registered without party preference.
 
Newton Pham, 33, of Fountain Valley, has been appointed to the 32nd District Agricultural Association, Orange County Fair Board of Directors. Pham has been vice president at California Bank and Trust since 2014. He was principal financial analyst at Mitsubishi Materials U.S.A. from 2012 to 2014, senior analyst at McGladrey Capital Markets LLC from 2007 to 2012 and associate consultant at Smith Barney, Citigroup Global Markets from 2004 to 2007. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Pham is a Democrat.
 
Geoff Bitle, 38, of Artois, has been appointed to the 42nd District Agricultural Association, Glenn County Fair Board of Directors. Bitle has been a pest control advisor at Colusa County Farm Supply since 2009. He was a manager at Broken Box Ranch from 2002 to 2009. Bitle is president of the Glenn-Colusa Cattlemen Association and a member of the California Cattlemen’s Association and the California Association of Pest Control Advisers. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Bitle is a Republican.
 
Candice Pierce, 36, of Orland, has been appointed to the 42nd District Agricultural Association, Glenn County Fair Board of Directors. Pierce was a substitute teacher for the Glenn County Office of Education from 2005 to 2007. She is a member of the Capay Parent Teacher Organization, Orland Little League Baseball and the Butte County Mothers of Multiples. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Pierce is a Democrat.
 
 
    ###
Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr.
State Capitol Building
Sacramento, CA 95814

For information about the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, please contact the Office of External Affairs at (916) 224-8137 or email Albert.Rivas@cdcr.ca.gov